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Monthly Review Magazine

Padilla v Hanft: A Very Dangerous Decision

Today’s decision in Padilla v Hanft is bad news, though exactly how bad it is will depend on what the Supreme Court does with it — and who’s on that court. The long and the short of it is that the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the right of the government to hold even […]

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Neoliberalism, the New Social Darwinism, and New Orleans

Numerous critics have noted the current administration’s lack of effective response to the New Orleans catastrophe and explained it merely in terms of incompetence and callousness. Something more fundamental, deeper than Katrina’s storm surge, is at play here, however. The administration’s “response,” especially regarding the poor (predominantly people of color) who lacked the wherewithal to […]

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SDS

Paul Buhle Seeks SDS Graphics and Memoirs

Paul Buhle, a distinguished historian, is scripting a graphic history (in comic art form) of Students for a Democratic Society. He welcomes visual contributions to it and also memoirs of SDS experiences. Potential contributors should contact Buhle at . He may be also reached at Department of American Civilization, Box 1892, Brown University, 82 Waterman […]

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The Medacine [i.e. Medicine] Man Taken at the Battle of Wounded Knee, S.D.

John Wayne and the New Orleans Indians

“The cavalry is coming!” announced a reporter on the Fox News Channel when National Guardsmen finally trooped into downtown New Orleans on the fourth day of apocalypse. I said to myself, “There they go again, racist Fox News.” I switched channels and found reporters and government officials repeating the same phrase: “The cavalry has arrived.” […]

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Time Table of the Lowell Mills

Keep the “Labor” in Labor Day: Remembering the Lowell Mill Girls

“In vain do I try to soar in fancy and imagination above the dull reality around me but beyond the roof of the factory I cannot rise.” — anonymous Lowell Mill worker, 1826 Lowell, Massachusetts was named after the wealthy Lowell family. They owned numerous textile mills, which attracted the unmarried daughters of New England […]

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Labor Day Poses Hard Questions

It’s impossible to celebrate Labor Day 2005 without asking some hard questions: How organized is “organized” labor? How much of a movement is the labor “movement”? The last six weeks have torn away whatever shreds of clothing the emperor might have been wearing.  We can deny the crisis no longer. In late July at the […]

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Britain to World: Shut Up

I have often wondered about the legal and moral issues involved in the Israeli-Palestinian struggle. Armed resistance is permitted against an occupier, and there’s no rule requiring that attackers have a getaway planned. I’m not in favor of attacking civilians, of course — in fact, I find it hard to support attacking anyone. But as […]

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David Houston and Jan Carlino

Tributes to David Houston

David Houston changed my life.  If it weren’t for Dave, I wouldn’t be a political economist, a political activist, and I wouldn’t have a sense of my life as part of a larger historical struggle for economic and social justice. Dave, along with his friend David Bramhall who concentrated on teaching undergraduates, were the sole […]

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Waiting for the Outside World

In the “old days” of the U.S. peace movement, when many people focused on the threat of a global nuclear “exchange,” an organization called Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) foretold what would happen if a major American city was actually blasted by an atomic bomb. Horrific scenarios extended far beyond the numbers of dead and […]

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Europe, Capitalism, and Socialism

In the Spring of 2005, workers’ votes in France and the Netherlands made the difference in defeating the draft European constitution and ending socialist party control of the German state of Baden-Wurttemberg. In the few weeks after those momentous events, most politicians and reporters offered one basic explanation. It tells us much more about the […]

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Paheli

A Dream and a Nightmare

Two films, Paheli and Matrubhumi: A Nation without Women, hit theatres in India within weeks of each other. Significantly, both the films, directed by Amol Palekar and Manish Jha respectively, have or claim to have women at the centre of their discourse. In the promos of Paheli, the producer-actor Shah Rukh Khan talked of the […]

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