Top Menu

Subjects Archives: Inequality

Laguna del Maule, a lake in the Andes mountain range, 300 kilometres south of Chile’s capital Santiago.

Politicizing water in Chile

Chile is today in the midst of an unprecedented constituent process 30 years after the return of democracy, where the possibility of a new constitution has opened a discussion about what sort of country we want, and which rights should be enshrined in the drafting of this fundamental document.

Continue Reading
Protest, October 5, 2011 (Photo credit: Michael Fleshman)

Beyond the permanent state of emergency 

Not long before the Twin Towers fell, the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben resurrected a concept anathema to the liberal notion of progress—the idea that unrelenting crisis is not necessarily exceptional. Agamben employed the image of “the Camp” to describe the space and time “when the state of exception begins to become the rule.”

Continue Reading
Mara Liasson

Factchecking NPR’s attempted takedown of Bernie Sanders

The Iowa caucuses officially began the Democratic primary, and even in this ongoing, extended battle for the White House, Iowa remains an important marker for candidates and the media. A close look at a piece by two of NPR’s leading political reporters, which aired just before the caucuses, provides a view of how journalists speak […]

Continue Reading
Chicago

The Torture Machine, Racism and Violence in Chicago

The Torture Machine, Racism and Police Violence in Chicago, by People’s Law Office and longtime National Lawyers Guild attorney Flint Taylor, is a meticulously detailed and authentic, truly appalling story of shame and disgrace to the city of Chicago, its political and police administration establishments, and numerous judges of the Cook County criminal courts; an […]

Continue Reading
A security officer inspects a damaged car after a bomb explosion which targeted a former Kadhafi regime officer, in Benghazi, on November 7, 2012. A car bomb exploded in Libya's second city of Benghazi late November 7, wounding an officer who had served in the regime of slain leader Moamer Kadhafi, a local security official told AFP. Hussam al-Raaid, a former officer of the toppled regime's reviled internal security services, was wounded when his booby-trapped vehicle exploded outside his house, the official said on condition of anonymity. AFP PHOTO / Abdullah Douma

Libya is being torn apart by outsiders

Ghassan Salamé is the head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya. He took over this job in 2017, six years after the catastrophic NATO war on Libya. What Salamé inherited was a country torn into shreds, two governments in place—one in Tripoli and one in Tobruk—and one civil war that had too many […]

Continue Reading
«I have never seen a comparable case» – Nils Melzer, the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture.

A murderous system is being created before our very eyes

A made-up rape allegation and fabricated evidence in Sweden, pressure from the UK not to drop the case, a biased judge, detention in a maximum security prison, psychological torture–and soon extradition to the U.S., where he could face up to 175 years in prison for exposing war crimes. For the first time, the UN Special […]

Continue Reading
Auschwitz, the BBC and antisemitism smears

Auschwitz, the BBC and antisemitism smears

Guerin had dared, unlike any of her colleagues in the western media, to allude to the terrible price inflicted on the Palestinian people by the west’s decision to help the Zionist movement create a Jewish state shortly after the Holocaust. The Palestinians were dispossessed of their homeland as apparent compensation–at least for those Jews who […]

Continue Reading
Santu Mofokeng, Eyes Wide Shut, Motouleng Cave, Clarens – Free State, 2004.

I will hold you in my arms a day after the war

On Monday, 27 January, the South African photographer Santu Mofokeng slipped away. His camera had been a familiar presence in the anti-apartheid struggle; after years of photographing police violence and popular resistance, he tired of making ‘images bespeaking gloom, monotony, anguish, struggle, [and] oppression’, he wrote in 1993.

Continue Reading