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Subjects Archives: Political Economy

Protest, October 5, 2011 (Photo credit: Michael Fleshman)

Beyond the permanent state of emergency 

Not long before the Twin Towers fell, the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben resurrected a concept anathema to the liberal notion of progress—the idea that unrelenting crisis is not necessarily exceptional. Agamben employed the image of “the Camp” to describe the space and time “when the state of exception begins to become the rule.”

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Illustration by Tom Lynton

Democracy in Focus: Follow the dark money…

Greater Britain, as we might call it, has over the past 70 years transformed itself from the largest-ever land empire to a sprawling financial one: a network of tax havens and money laundries stashing cash for the world’s oligarchs, mafiosi, gangsters and hedge funds.

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Cheapism Blog 76 Quality Products That Are Still Made in the USA | Cheapism.com

Health check: U.S. manufacturing is in trouble

President Trump is all in, touting his success in rebuilding U.S. manufacturing.  For example, in his state of the union address he claimed: We are restoring our nation’s manufacturing might, even though predictions were that this could never be done. After losing 60,000 factories under the previous two administrations, America has now gained 12,000 new […]

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Crimen Suicidio Muerte

The blockade, a weapon that causes more death than war

It deliberately affects defenseless civilians, such as children, the elderly and the sick. The US blockade against Cuba is the most severe and prolonged applied against any country, but it is estimated that one third of the world’s population suffers its effects: there are more than eight thousand sanctions in 39 countries.

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Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg and debt as an imperialist instrument

In her book titled The Accumulation of Capital, published in 1913, Rosa Luxemburg devoted an entire chapter to international loans in order to show how the great capitalist powers of the time used the credits granted by their bankers to the countries of the periphery to exercise economic, military and political domination on the latter.

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A still from The Young Karl Marx (2017)

A possible Communist redefinition of love

In In Praise of Love, Alain Badiou defined love as a form of “minimal communism [where] the real subject of a love is the becoming of the couple and not the mere satisfaction of the individuals that are its component parts.”(1) Earlier in the book, Badiou provided a more elegant statement, associating the act of […]

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“A reindeer stands in silent protest in front of a hydro power plant” on Indigenous Sámi land in northern Scandinavia. Image: Tobias Herrmann CC BY-NC 2.0

Who owns the Green New Deal?

Making sense of remote ownership problems and place-based governance. Grappling with entrenched problems of remote ownership is one way to take a focused approach to building momentum for this movement.

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A security officer inspects a damaged car after a bomb explosion which targeted a former Kadhafi regime officer, in Benghazi, on November 7, 2012. A car bomb exploded in Libya's second city of Benghazi late November 7, wounding an officer who had served in the regime of slain leader Moamer Kadhafi, a local security official told AFP. Hussam al-Raaid, a former officer of the toppled regime's reviled internal security services, was wounded when his booby-trapped vehicle exploded outside his house, the official said on condition of anonymity. AFP PHOTO / Abdullah Douma

Libya is being torn apart by outsiders

Ghassan Salamé is the head of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya. He took over this job in 2017, six years after the catastrophic NATO war on Libya. What Salamé inherited was a country torn into shreds, two governments in place—one in Tripoli and one in Tobruk—and one civil war that had too many […]

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Santu Mofokeng, Eyes Wide Shut, Motouleng Cave, Clarens – Free State, 2004.

I will hold you in my arms a day after the war

On Monday, 27 January, the South African photographer Santu Mofokeng slipped away. His camera had been a familiar presence in the anti-apartheid struggle; after years of photographing police violence and popular resistance, he tired of making ‘images bespeaking gloom, monotony, anguish, struggle, [and] oppression’, he wrote in 1993.

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Coronavirus outbreak

Notes on a novel coronavirus

The virus’s final penetrance worldwide will depend on the difference between the rate of infection and the rate of removing infections—by recovery or death. If the infection rate far exceeds removal, then the penetrance may approach the whole of humanity, although there will likely accrue large geographic differences.

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