• Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Berlin Wall and Kaiser Palace: Berlin Bulletin No. 194 August 10, 2021

    Until 1989 that terrible Berlin Wall angered many an East German. The small part of Germany it helped preserve for 28 years was always the butt of anger, sarcasm, vituperation and resistance in one form or another.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    A happy warrior + Esther Bejarano + Presente: Berlin Bulletin No. 193 July 20, 2021

    Esther Bejarano’s death hits hard, leaving a painful gap in Germany’s anti-fascist scene. Most media and many politicians voiced their praise and mourning—after almost totally ignoring her in life and attacking and trying to squelch organizations she was active in, as an avowed Communist.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Jack and Jill tumble: Berlin Bulletin No. 192, July 3, 2021

    After legally receiving a Christmas gift of 24,000 euros from her party, Annalena Baerbock somehow neglected to report it in her tax returns. No big deal, some might think, but after the scandals about Christian Democrats nobly enriching themselves when purchasing face-masks, and two far bigger scandals hanging over the head of the Social Democrats’ chancellor candidate Scholz (currently still Finance Minister), the squeaky clean reputation of the Greens had been a major asset. No longer!

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Donald Rumsfeld—RIP: Berlin Bulletin No. 191, July 3, 2021

    Don’t speak ill of the dead, they say, but if I were to choose candidates for a Hall of Evil Fame, I’d have to ignore such advice; the late Donald Rumsfeld would be close to the top of my list.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Small State but big questions

    A week ago Saxony-Anhalt voted! The media prediction – a neck-and-neck race – was cock-eyed! But outside Sachsen-Anhalt (in German), did anyone really give a damn? Yes, some did!

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Anger and dismay

    “The Israeli warplanes bombed many different places in my area with more than 40 consecutive missiles, without issuing the prior warnings they used to issue in the past three wars. The sound of the bombing and shelling was so terrifying that I cannot describe it.”

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Greens, vaccines, maneuvers

    The Green party was at first an iconoclastic bunch, leftish, even radical. Its deputies, often women, showed up in the Bundestag knitting or even wearing woolen sweaters, shocking the conservatives. But its radicals grew older; many got rewarding professional jobs; its fundamentalist wing (“fundis“) lost out to the pragmatic “realos“ (realists). The Green retreat has continued ever since.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Scandals, elections and emergencies

    Germany, once viewed as an exaggerated model of exactitude and discipline, is currently in a muddle.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Surprise on the left

    Surprise, surprise! Things worked out quite differently than expected at the congress of the LINKE, the left-wing party.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Echoes and elections

    The U.S.-American night-mare, tight-lipped and pouting, was finally forced to gallop off to its luxurious stable in Florida. Almost every European joined in “Hurrah!” cheers as it watched him go!

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    An icy rally with burning demands

    The survival of polar bears, we know, is sadly threatened. The survival of a more colorful bear species seems assured. HARIBO (an acronym of HAns RIegel BOnn), which makes those little “gold bears” sweets, was founded in a laundry room in 1920.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Airports and rallies

    Ding-dong, the wicked witch is dead! A wicked but very male Witch of the East seemed to be crushed under a houseful of angry voters, though this house, unlike Dorothy’s in The Wizard of Oz, was definitely not from Kansas!

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Thirty years unified Germany

    This Saturday many Germans, party leaders and media pundits above all, will recall October 3, 1990, when their dreams of a unified Germany became reality.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Which way?

    Ups and downs in Germany are less dramatic than in Minsk or the USA, now suffering under the corona pandemic, terrifying forest fires and worrisome election-fever. But Germany, too, could veer left or right.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Mirror mirror and politics

    “Mirror, mirror on the wall…” Nearly every German knows the story of Snow White. Currently, the question of who is “fairest of them all” faces nearly every German political party or, in modern terms, who can attract more votes in next year’s election.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Some come, others go

    On Saturday, crowds came to Berlin from all over Germany for a huge mass parade, estimated at 17,000 to 20,000. The big crowd in Berlin, after picking up steam for weeks with smaller rallies, insisted that the whole corona virus pandemic had ended or maybe hadn’t really existed at all!

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Breakups and leaks

    Those still following international relations may have noticed an unusual tearing sound growing louder. Recent developments, not conclusive or complete and yet undeniable, suggest the painful ripping apart of that eternal brotherhood between the German Federal Republic and its great patron, provider and protector, the USA.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Asparagus and bombers

    While prices and recipes for asparagus, dates and restrictions for re-opening dominated the media and many conversations, a far more significant matter found little attention. Ever since 1955 an estimated twenty American nuclear bombs have been stored underground at the U.S. Air Force base in Büchel in Rhineland. A German politician recently proposed spending $3 billion on a replacement fleet but ran into a snag.

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    What can normalcy bring?

    With COVID-19 figures flattening downward, Germany is limping back to some kind of normalcy. Auto and bike shops, book dealers, barbers and most shops less than 800 m2 can now re-open (with customers 5 ft apart). Bigger shops and department stores are squabbling: “Why not us?”

  • Berlin Bulletin by Victor Grossman

    Corona and what then?

    Berlin, like many of your hometowns, is a ghost city. Except for those offering groceries, medicines or medical care, everything is shut tight. Luckily, no-one here has to stay inside, we can stroll around outside but, aside from families, we may not “assemble” in groups of more than two (if any cops are around).