Top Menu

Archive | October, 2005

Labor Notes

The Bankruptcy Bomb: Companies Use Bankruptcy Threats and Courts to Force Bigger Givebacks, Break Unions

Employers in heavily unionized U.S. industries are turning to bankruptcy courts as a strategy for gutting union contracts and imposing layoffs and givebacks even deeper than those workers made in the concessions of the early 1980s. Bankruptcy-as-a-strategy first became prominent during the restructuring of the steel industry in the late 1990s, then spread to the […]

Continue Reading
Michael Perelman

In Patents We Trust: How the U.S. Government Learned to Stop Worrying about Monopoly and Love Intellectual Property

Today, patents supposedly exist to provide an incentive for new discoveries. Patents had a different purpose at their origin. When the Venetians invented what today we would call intellectual property in the fifteenth century, governments openly treated it as an element of state power.  Workers could enjoy monopolistic privileges only if they continued to strengthen […]

Continue Reading
Central Government Expenditure in Israel

Neo-colonialism — a Palestinian Nightmare

The Israeli occupation of Gaza Strip didn’t end — it merely changed form. With the completion of the Israeli army withdrawal from Gaza Strip, and the eviction of all the settlers from there, its occupation has seemingly ended. And indeed, if by “occupation” we mean, as the Israeli establishment wants us to understand, a mere […]

Continue Reading

MAINTENANCE-FREE LIVING

Near the few remaining woods are modern pictographs,                                           warning passing vehicles of the presence of deer, not for the protection of the deer but for the protection of the vehicles                                                             And a few of the signs are boastful, a strange sort of civic boosterism: our deer here                     were not […]

Continue Reading
The Legend of Bhagat Singh

Three Films and a Nation

The number of films on national figures like Gandhi, Ambedkar, Savarkar, and Bhagat Singh, as well as films like Lagaan and Gadar, in recent years point to an interest in revaluation and reinterpretation of history, especially that of the freedom struggle, in India. That this has happened in the last few years needs an explanation. […]

Continue Reading

No Rules, Just Right?

As I was driving through Ithaca, New York, on the weekend of the Grassroots Folk Festival, a guy with long curly hair and a beard — the sort of ‘sixties revenant common in college towns — strode into traffic on a red light.  I stopped my car, momentarily annoyed, and he grinned and flashed me […]

Continue Reading

The Socialist Vision and Left Activism

Monthly Review‘s July-August issue, focused on the theme of “Socialism for the 21st Century,” made me ponder the question of possible working-class organizing in the 21st century to build resistance to capitalism, the resistance that can dialectically develop into socialism. Harry Magdoff and Fred Magdoff wrote in “Approaching Socialism”: “[I]ntellectuals and specialists cannot derive a […]

Continue Reading
Our Dictator

BC Teachers Hold the Line — the Government Blinks

19 October 2005 Teachers in British Columbia are standing on the rainy picket lines this morning for Day 8 of an unprecedented illegal strike against the Liberal provincial government.  This strike has surprised nearly everyone in its strength and resolve and is shaking the political culture of BC to its core. The strike began on […]

Continue Reading
The Switch to Services

Strike for Peace: An Interview with Brian Bogart

Activist Brian Bogart asked himself: “Our top industry has been the manufacture and sale of weapons — and we’re a peace-loving nation?” Inspired by this paradox, Bogart created Strike for Peace . . . described on its website as an attempt “to highlight for everyone’s sake the dominant role of the military industry in America’s […]

Continue Reading