Archive | News

  • The Letelier-Moffitt Assassination: New Evidence

    The Guardian reports that Chilean President Augusto Pinochet personally ordered the assassination of Orlando Letelier and Ronni Moffitt, in Washington, D.C. in September 1976. So, you may say, what’s new?  After all, my partner Sam Buffone and I sued Chile for these murders and won a judgment.  At the trial, our expert witness said that […]

  • Resisting Wholesale Electronic Invasion of the Fourth Amendment

    National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) Foundation for Criminal Justice dinner, Denver, Colorado, July 24, 2015 A few months ago, I spoke to a group of lawyers in Los Angeles.  I talked about legal ethics.  I mentioned Henry Drinker, author of ABA ethical rules, author of a book that was the basis for the […]

  • To Recover Strategic Thought and Political Practice

    It is common to understand the diverse “processes” in Latin America — in the period marked initially by Zapatismo in the mid-1990s and later by the emergence of left or popular governments in Venezuela, Bolivia, and Ecuador along with center-left governments in Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina — within the theoretical framework of a return or […]

  • P(h)ew: The “Nonpartisan” Embrace of Narendra Modi by the Pew Research Center

    The Pew Research Center released a new survey that reveals a very favorable perspective of Narendra Modi among Indians.  In fact, the header for the report reads: “The Modi Bounce: Indians Give Their Prime Minister and Economy High Marks, Worry about Crime, Jobs, Prices, Corruption.”1  According to the results 87% of Indians have a “favorable […]

  • RISE: Scotland’s Left Alliance

    One year on from the historic Scottish independence referendum politics here are utterly changed. The long dominant Labour Party, which opted to campaign against independence — alongside the Conservatives, loathed by the big majority of Scots voters, and the now virtually demolished Liberal Democrats in the Better Together alliance — reaped the whirlwind at the […]

  • On the Current Conjuncture and Agrarian Reform in Brazil

      The political crisis that began after the re-election of Dilma Rousseff and the offensive by the opposition and the most conservative sectors of the country has put some warnings on the agenda again. Given the national and international political conjuncture, one of the main warnings is not to equate political struggle with electoral struggle […]

  • Altruism: Viral & More Dangerous Than ISIS

    Early this month in Germany, a few thousand refugees from war-torn Syria and neighboring countries spilled out of a train station and into Munich.  Rather than being tripped by the locals, or thrown inside cargo trucks, or sorted out according to skin color (as per quaint Old World custom), the migrants were actually welcomed by […]

  • #CizreyeSesVer / #GiveVoiceToCizre: Urgent Call for International Action

    Turkey is increasingly drifting into a civil war.  Politics of violence have escalated after the general elections of June 7 led by the AKP provisional government.  Today, the peace and negotiation process between PKK and the Turkish state has come to a halt and war has started again. Just within the last month, severe clashes […]

  • Refugee Crisis: The Result of Western Wars and Destabilization

    Everyone is talking about refugees, but why isn’t anyone talking about the reason why they have to leave their homes?  What is happening in the Middle East is no natural disaster.  The refugee crisis is a direct result of a policy of destabilization and war. Translation by Antikrieg TV.  See, also, Dietmar Bartsch and Sahra […]

  • Bombs for Peace: A Review

    George Szamuely.  Bombs for Peace: NATO’s Humanitarian War on Yugoslavia.  Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2013 (Distributed in the U.S. and Canada by the University of Chicago Press).  Paper.  Pp. 611. In Bombs for Peace, George Szamuely, a senior research fellow at the Global Policy Institute at London Metropolitan University, has produced a revealing and sharply […]

  • Immigrants, Welcome and Unwelcome

    A silent three-year-old, lying drowned on a Turkish beach; the tearful protest of a Syrian man as he, his wife and baby are torn from the tracks next to a locomotive by Hungarian police; desperate families jammed into tiny, leaky boats, hoping to reach Europe alive or, if they do, facing ever new obstacles from […]

  • People’s Power & People’s Protagonism: Linking Practice to Visions of Twenty-First Century Socialism

      Register Now – Limited Space Available! SF BAY AREA – SEPTEMBER 13TH, 4-6PM * REGISTER HERE (Presentation Theater, University of San Francisco School of Education, 2350 Turk Boulevard, San Francisco) NEW YORK CITY – SEPTEMBER 18TH, 7-9PM * REGISTER HERE (Verso Loft, 20 Jay St [10th Floor], Brooklyn) We are honored to bring Marta […]

  • The Devaluation of the Yuan

    The Chinese central bank’s decision last week to let the yuan depreciate, in three stages by almost 4 percent against the US dollar, was officially explained as a move towards greater market determination of its exchange rate.  Though this explanation pacified stock markets around the world, China’s devaluation of the currency portends a serious accentuation […]

  • Courts Dismiss Claim That Amnesties Trigger Migration

    On August 14 a federal appeals court dismissed as “speculation” one of the most persistent of the anti-immigrant right’s many fantasies: the claim that any sort of humane treatment of undocumented immigrants by the U.S. government will lead inevitably to a “flood” of foreigners pouring over our borders. At issue was a suit in which […]

  • The Young Lords Retake NYC, With a Little Help from Johanna Fernández

    For five years, Johanna Fernández, history professor at Baruch College, worked to set up three separate art installations around New York City, one of which she curated.  She worked without funding, to tell the story of the Young Lords, a 1960s, mostly Puerto Rican, street gang that morphed into a revolutionary action group inspired by […]

  • Behind Puerto Rico’s Debt, Corporations That Drain Profits from the Island

      The Phenomenal Drain of Profits Beginning in the 1970s, Puerto Rico’s economy began to suffer a drain of profits, to the point where the measure of total income produced in the island, the Gross Domestic Product, began to separate dramatically from the measure of income that residents own, the Gross National Product or GNP. […]

  • The Opening of the New Suez Canal

    On the 6th of August, the waterway that doubles the Suez Canal will be inaugurated. Egypt will have demonstrated that it is capable of conceiving and executing a grand project of this magnitude on its own . . . like China (I will get back to this comparison).  Just a year ago, when the Egyptian […]

  • The Liberals and Inequality, Then and Now

    Articles on income equality sometimes note that the U.S. economy hasn’t faced the current level of disparity since 1928, on the eve of the Great Depression.  There has been much less discussion of the responses to the issue back then, even though income inequality was a major concern for policymakers as the Depression deepened and […]

  • Europe’s Moment of Truth

    Greek Premier Alexis Tsipras’ acceptance of an “austerity package” on July 13, which contained measures rejected by the Greek people in a referendum barely a week before, represents not just an abject surrender by the Syriza government, or a sign of contempt on the part of German finance capital for the Greek electorate; it marks […]

  • What Would the KKE Do If It Were in SYRIZA’s Place?

    We often hear the following, well-intentioned question: “What would you have done if you had been in the place of the SYRIZA government?” The question is not illogical.  But we must put it in the right perspective. If we, the KKE, were in the “place” of SYRIZA, meaning the place of bourgeois management, the place […]