Top Menu

Geography Archives: Southeast Asia

Nepal

Nepal: Witnessing the People’s Movement

  As the Nepalese people’s struggle against the autocratic feudal monarchy to establish a democratic republic hit a high point during the month of April, it coincided with the arrival from India of the Second International Road-Building Brigade.  While the old oppressive and exploitative feudalist world was being attacked and dismantled in the country’s towns […]

Continue Reading

The Dogs of War — Barking at the Moon?

The current debate in Congress over the war in Iraq has put the myth of victory and its opposite — surrender– back on the front pages.  These are actually more than myths; they are genuine misrepresentations of what’s happening in Iraq — lies, in other words.  It doesn’t really matter, though, because those who want […]

Continue Reading
A Brief History of Neoliberalism

On Neoliberalism: An Interview with David Harvey

A BRIEF HISTORY OF NEOLIBERALISM by David HarveyBUY THIS BOOK Neoliberalism has left an indelible, smoldering mark on our world for the last thirty years.  Eminent Marxist geographer David Harvey, author of A Brief History of Neoliberalism (Oxford, 2005), spoke earlier this year to Sasha Lilley, of the radical radio program Against the Grain, about […]

Continue Reading

Constituent Assembly Now!

  Yesterday’s so-called royal proclamation does not have any worth and significance other than fulfilling feudal arrogance and underrating the great Nepalese sea of the masses, which, chanting slogans of constituent assembly and republic, is flowing into the streets to give a new direction to the world by creative application of people’s revolution in the […]

Continue Reading
Thaksin Ample Rich, Thais Ample Poor

Mass Upsurge in Thailand: Students and Workers on the March

  “Predictions are suspect.  But something new is happening. . . .” — Paul Buhle1 A people’s movement against the “class war from above” is beginning to crystallize across Thailand.  Students and unionized workers have suddenly emerged as a new force in the streets in helping to organize a broad-based people’s alliance to oust the […]

Continue Reading

Naming The System

  Most of us grew up thinking that the United States was a strong but humble nation, that involved itself in world affairs only reluctantly, that respected the integrity of other nations and other systems, and that engaged in wars only as a last resort. This was a nation with no large standing army, with […]

Continue Reading
ACLU: Nixon Lied to the American People and Broke the Law. So Did He.

A Means to Effect the Peaceful Overthrow of a Tyrant

The summer 2005 revelations by former FBI assistant director W. Mark Felt that he was the source known as Deep Throat that helped bring down Richard Nixon has revived talk among certain US residents regarding the impeachment of George Bush and Dick Cheney.  While I have great reservations about the likelihood of such an event […]

Continue Reading
Unit 731

Japan’s Modern Historical Loop

The news of world affairs these days is highly unlikely to delight the Japanese survivors of the two nuclear terrorist attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the United States’ armed forces sixty years ago. Those attacks were not meant to convince the Japanese leaders to surrender, something which they were about to do anyway, but […]

Continue Reading

Border Vigilantes and Mass Migration

Vigilantism along the U.S.-Mexico border, which dates back to the U.S. conquest of Mexico, refuses to die.  The latest vigilante group, the Minuteman Civil Defense Corps, claims 15,000 volunteers willing to patrol the border in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California.  During April, the group staged a border watch in southern Arizona to stop illegal […]

Continue Reading

“Pas de vacances pour les bourgeois!”

“Pas de vacances pour les bourgeois!” (no vacation for the bourgeois) was a favorite slogan at the Sorbonne during the May 1968 nationwide revolt in France. Not supported by any established political parties (including the CPF), the movement which originally started among students who took over the universities came to include workers who occupied factories […]

Continue Reading
Washington Post/Kaiser Family Foundation/Harvard University Social Security Knowledge Poll, 3-6 Feb. 2005

Lift the Cap on Social Security Taxes

My four-year-old son is fond of asking me, “how goes the work?” Well, if he means working for economic justice, the answer is, “not so well, Sam.” Oh, there are signs of hope. The anti-globalization movement has challenged prerogatives of capital in the international economy. And the Bush administration’s attempt to privatize social security by […]

Continue Reading