Subjects Archives: Literature

  • Che Guevara stamp

    Che Guevara stamp sells out first run in ‘unprecedented’ public demand

    THE Che Guevara stamp produced by An Post to mark the 50th anniversary of the Latin American freedom fighter’s murder on 9 October 1967 by CIA-backed Bolivian state forces has sold out its initial 120,000 print run.

  • Nazi flag flies from Austrian legation in Washington, D.C. on March 12, 1938 (New York Public Library) .

    How American racism shaped nazism

    Depending on the reader’s perspective, Whitman’s central argument seems either modest or bold, as he claims, “What all this research unmistakably reveals is that the Nazis did find precedents and parallels and inspirations in the United States” (10). The most radical Nazis were often the most enthused about American legal precedents. More moderate, less anti-Semitic members of the Nazi Party tended to be more skeptical of American approaches. For some Nazis, “American race law looked too racist” (5). America “was the leading racist jurisdiction” in the 1930s (138).

  • International Congress of Intellectuals for Peace (Wroctaw, Poland, 1948).

    Red scientist: two strands from a life in three colours

    An exploration of Bernal’s contribution to the politicization of science and scientists, above all the development of the Social Relations of Science movement.

  • Writing while socialist

    With each workshop the broad outlines of socialist writing become clear to me. I am now able to better distinguish between capitalist writing—which typically emerges from the liberal, mainstream media and is intended to produce commodities—and socialist writing—which is intended to produce a confident community of struggle.

  • White people; Viewing the Performance of 'The Merry Wives of Windsor’ in the Globe Theatre (1840) by David Scott. Photo courtesy the V&A Musuem

    How ‘white people’ were invented by a playwright in 1613

    The Jacobean playwright Thomas Middleton invented the concept of ‘white people’ on 29 October 1613, the date that his play The Triumphs of Truth was first performed. The phrase was first uttered by the character of an African king who looks out upon an English audience and declares: ‘I see amazement set upon the faces/Of these white people, wond’rings and strange gazes.’

  • Das Kapital Karl Marx

    Soft shell, hard core: on the 150th anniversary of the publication of Karl Marx’s Capital, Vol. 1

    In bourgeois economic theory, competition, commodity production, profit seeking, and growth express something like the human essence. They are ahistorical constants, not the results of specifically capitalist relations that have historically emerged and can therefore be overcome. This is exactly what makes Marx’s critique of economics highly topical.

  • “Marx was not a profet nor a creator of uthopias, he was a rigorous theoricist” claims the professor / Credit: Youtube

    Capital is not a bible nor a cookbook”, says José Paulo Netto

    The work of Karl Marx, Capital, considered “the Bible” of the revolution, was first published 150 years ago. Many political and ideological battles are fought until this day in the name of the German intellectual and his biggest work.

  • Past continuous: Karl Marx’s Capital can help unravel the perplexities of modern-day capitalism

    On September 14, it will be exactly 150 years since the publication of Capital: Critique of Political Economy, the first volume of Karl Marx’s epochal Das Kapital. The historicity of the book can be gauged by the fact that this first of three bulky tomes was published by a Hamburg publisher two years after the American Civil War but well above a decade before the incandescent bulb was invented. Capital however, literally acted as the bulb that shone a light on many a way.

  • All Exxon Mobile worries swept under the rug.

    Slick maneuvers

    Both ExxonMobil and the Wall Street Journal have been engaged in pretty slick maneuvers in order to protect their profits by failing to publish any opinions critical of ExxonMobil.

  • James Baldwin

    Forgetting to remember

    It is a devastating fact that James Baldwin is our contemporary; so much so, that the matter of his relevance seems either pressing or redundant depending on to whom one speaks. Raoul Peck’s I Am Not Your Negro, a “cinematic séance” (The Guardian), is being taken as the completion of Baldwin’s unfinished Remember This House, […]

  • Supporters of President Nicolas Maduro rally to support him while carrying pictures of late Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez, in Caracas, Venezuela, May 8, 2017.

    Standoff in Venezuela

    Venezuela has been rocked in recent weeks by almost daily protests and counter-protests, as right-wing opponents of socialist President Nicolas Maduro seek to bring down his government.

  • We Stand with Palestine in the Spirit of “Sumud”

    At a moment of growing resistance to state violence and injustice the world over, a delegation of nineteen anti-prison, labor and scholar-activists from the United States traveled to Palestine in March 2016.  Our delegation included former U.S.-held political prisoners and social prisoners, former Black Panther Party members, prison abolitionists, trade unionists and university professors.  We […]

  • “Why Socialism?” Revisited: Reflections Inspired by Albert Einstein

    Why should one seek socialism?  It is common to adduce that socialism would be more just and fair than capitalism, but that does not fully resolve the issue, since people are not always motivated by social justice.  Moreover motivation — especially for undertakings that are difficult and risky, such as changing a whole society! — […]

  • The Young Lords Retake NYC, With a Little Help from Johanna Fernández

    For five years, Johanna Fernández, history professor at Baruch College, worked to set up three separate art installations around New York City, one of which she curated.  She worked without funding, to tell the story of the Young Lords, a 1960s, mostly Puerto Rican, street gang that morphed into a revolutionary action group inspired by […]

  • Charleston Massacre

    He had grown bloated on the red hot empty calories of right wing race hatred. He carried his gun hidden in his pants like sex power into a church to murder. What safer place to slaughter? On city streets someone else might be carrying, but church was guaranteed to let him kill without danger to […]

  • Remembering Robert Weil: Intellectual and Political Activist

      Robert Weil, author of the powerful critique of Deng Xiaoping’s “reforms” entitled Red Cat, White Cat: China and the Contradictions of Market Socialism (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1996, republished in India by Cornerstone Publications, Kharagpur), quietly passed away in California on 12 March 2014.  Almost a year after, on 15 February 2015 a […]

  • The Writing Is on the Wall: Join Veterans For Peace’s Memorial Day Letter-Writing Campaign

    The Pentagon is intent upon taking control of how we remember the American War in Vietnam.  Their myth-making has already begun and will continue for a decade of fifty-year commemorations.  Some of us are not going to stand by and let this happen.  We are fighting back.  We in Veterans For Peace are taking our […]

  • History of an Infamy

      Translator’s Note: David Ravelo, arrested on September 14, 2010 and imprisoned in La Picota Prison in Bogota, is serving an 18-year sentence.  Appeals have failed, although Colombia’s Supreme Court has been considering his case.  His words below attest to a lifetime of, as he puts it, defending human rights.  Beginning in the late 1980s […]

  • An Early Activist Critique of Stalin’s 1934 Antihomosexual Law: “A Chapter of Russian Reaction” by Kurt Hiller

      Introduction This article, titled “A Chapter of Russian Reaction,” translated into English here for the first time, was written in German by longtime homosexual activist Kurt Hiller (1885-1972) from London and published in the Swiss gay journal Der Kreis in 1946.  Hiller had been active in Germany’s first homosexual-rights organization, the Wissenschaftlich-humanitäre Komitee (Scientific […]

  • They Fear and They Kill

    It’s open season on wild turkeys. They harm no one, are decorative feathered dinosaurs.  Tough to eat, so why shoot?  But the season ends. It’s open season on Black youths all year, so long as you have a uniform and a gun.  They are genuinely scared, the cops. Kids of color are going to eat […]